Joint Crisis Committee: The Ukraine Conflict

Chairs: Colin Lucero-Dixon & Spencer Hsieh

About this committee:

The Joint Crisis Committee (JCC) is a crisis committee that consists of multiple sub-committees representing different interests within the overall conflict, which can often be, but is not limited to, the simulations of historical events. As a result, JCC adopts a different set of procedures commonly observed in General Assembly and Specialised Committees, and in addition have certain scenario specific and sub-committee specific special procedures.

TOPIC Background:

“The Conflict in Ukraine began in early 2014 with popular protests in the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv. After the victory of pro-west presidential candidate Petro Poroshenko, Russian special forces took control of the Crimean peninsula and unaffiliated soldiers entered eastern Ukraine to support pro-russian separatists. Violence quickly broke out between Ukrainian Government forces and Separatists in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine. Fighting has continued between these two groups since despite multiple ceasefires leaving over 10,000 people killed. Our committee will be split between the Ukrainian government and Separatist governments. Each group will be focusing both on how to engage with and gain support from the international community and manage their internal politics while trying to maintain and capture territory in the Donbass. We’re excited to see how you all will go about tackling the complex international and domestic dimensions of this conflict.”

The two rooms:

Separatist Government

Kyiv Government

background guide coming In November!

 

Letter from the Dias:

Hello Delegates,

My name is Eric Payerle and I have the honor of co-directing Joint Crisis Committee - The Ukraine Conflict at MUNUM XXXIII. I am a junior in the Ford School of Public Policy where I’ll be majoring in public policy with a minor in Political Science and Music. Aside from MUNUM and class, I play the Tenor Saxophone in both the Michigan Marching Band and Michigan Hockey band. Additionally, I work on the Marching Band Equipment staff. International relations and foreign affairs has always been the most exciting policy area for me which is why I’m engaged in Model UN and am particularly excited about this committee. Today, as we focus on major world powers, like our trade war with China or Russian election interference, it’s important to maintain an awareness of other conflicts occurring around the world. The Ukraine conflict pulls in a whole host of world powers and questions of self determination yet, since it first broke out, it has faded from our awareness. This committee will give us a chance to develop an understanding of the region and this conflict’s many challenges while balancing political discussion and military action.

My name is Colin Lucero-Dixon and I am also honored to serve as co-director of The Ukraine Conflict at MUNUM XXXIII. I am a junior in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts (LSA) majoring in American Culture and Film, Television and Media, with a minor in Philosophy. Outside of MUNUM, I have served on the executive board of the Filipino American Student Association and regularly attend tournaments for Super Smash Brothers Melee. Although none of what I study is necessarily directly applicable to international relations, my interest in political discussion has kept me involved with Model UN for nearly six years, now. Similar to my co-director, I am especially excited for you to engage with this topic, as it is likely a situation we’re all familiar with in the world today. However, I’m most excited for the new challenges this committee brings to Model UN and to crisis committees. In my experience, most crisis committees I’ve participated in—either as a delegate or on staff—have pursued one goal: to win in battle. I’m hoping that this committee will challenge you and your fellow delegates to thoroughly explore complex topics like political corruption, public opinion, military action, and many others.

My name is Spencer Hsieh and am honored to be your assistant director for MUNUM XXXIII JCC. I am a sophomore in the LSA Residential College studying French whilst pursuing a major in history. As a student of history, I think it is especially important for us to think about the circumstances past leaders faced. During our committee sessions, I hope the experience we provide would allow you to think from the perspective of the actors involved and understand the everyday realities and limitations. The Ukraine conflict, being a fairly recent event, enables us to understand it without too much afterthought, and with the establishment of different schools of understanding that will come as the event drifts towards the past, it provides an opportunity for further analysation, and through that, perhaps understand that there is much more to an event than what we hold as truth now.

The Conflict in Ukraine began in early 2014 with popular protests in the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv. After the victory of pro-west presidential candidate Petro Poroshenko, Russian special forces took control of the Crimean peninsula and unaffiliated soldiers entered eastern Ukraine to support pro-russian separatists. Violence quickly broke out between Ukrainian Government forces and Separatists in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine. Fighting has continued between these two groups since despite multiple ceasefires leaving over 10,000 people killed. Our committee will be split between the Ukrainian government and Separatist governments. Each group will be focusing both on how to engage with and gain support from the international community and manage their internal politics while trying to maintain and capture territory in the Donbass. We’re excited to see how you all will go about tackling the complex international and domestic dimensions of this conflict.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at epayerle@umich.edu and colucero@umich.edu.

Go Blue!

Eric, Colin, and Spencer